Expanding #MeWeSyria spaces in Turkey + Lebanon

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Because of intense travel for #MeWeSyria, I have had little time to share the many insights, successes, and impacts made since October 2016. Since then, we have expanded refugee-led #MeWeSyria teams in Turkey and Lebanon. I promise to share more in the coming weeks and months. Here is a short summary of basic goings-on. Much much more to come.

January 2017: 

The numbers: 20+ Syrian facilitators and teachers were trained and signed-on to the innovative storytelling for changemakers methodology of #MeWeSyria after an intensive 4 day training of trainers and co-creation session. 20 replicators will implement localized versions of #MeWeSyria in 3 cities across Lebanon, reaching 270+ teenagers and parents.

October 2016:

The numbers: 18+ Syrian facilitators and teachers were trained and signed-on to #MeWeSyria localization. These brave changemakers will implement localized versions of #MeWeSyria in 3 cities in Southeast Turkey, reaching 400+ teenagers and parents.

  • Trends and quick insights:

  • Because of the war, and the level of loss and destruction, every Syrian–be they an engineer, teacher, artist, student—is now being called upon to be healers for the mental health/trauma/emotional paralysis that are epidemics for today’s Syria’s young.

  • Most Syrian refugee youth volunteers have expressed an urgent need to have new engagements and interventions for working with Syrian refugees. Traditional trainings and youth programs are not serving the needs of today’s refugee youth. Youth need opportunities for social and emotional learning, communications practice, and resiliency-building.

  • All Syrian refugee trainees are themselves wrestling with trauma and barriers to social and emotional development as a result of war and forced displacement.

  • All trainees expressed increased fear and pressures with handling youth who have mental health challenges or trauma. Syrian teachers and youth facilitators are noticing more and more Syrian kids are living off the streets and getting involved in either forced childhood marriage or drug abuse.

  • Youth are becoming increasingly vulnerable to apathy, isolation, and anger. And parents of refugee youth remain helpless, frustrated, and ill-equipped to handle these sensitive cases.

  • All expressed a desire to have more access and support for integrating social and emotional learning and wellbeing/mindfulness practices in their youth interventions.

  • Peace is now becoming a divisive and dangerous word among some Syrian communities, because of the death and destruction that has been allowed to persist during the failed processes of attaining cease-fires and peace deals over the past 5+ years of war.

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